Tag Archives: free volunteering

Fundraising and collecting Donations for a cause

Before arriving to Nepal, me and my friends did fundraising for Nepali Host Family to put towards their various projects for the children in Nepal. Back home, we had fund-raised some money by selling bottles of cold pressed extra virgin olive oil, sourced from regional South Australia. My parents helped bottle the olive oil into bottles bought in bulk from a family owned, local store. My brother then produced labels for the bottles which stated the cause of fundraising. With the help of both friends and family, I managed to sell 160 bottles of olive oil.

The bottles were advertised and sold via email and word of mouth. It was a great way to fund-raise because olive oil is such a commonly used item in Australia and so there was no trouble selling any bottles. Some of our friends had also donated for the cause. It was amazing how easily we could sell so many bottles in such a limited amount of time and we were over whelmed with the enthusiasm and generosity of our friends and family. Overall I believe it was a successful way to raise money for such a wonderful cause.

Alice
Australia

Fundraising would be the best way to help someone in need. We appreciate the efforts of Alice, her friends and their family for the help of underprivileged children in Nepal. The participant volunteers who travel to Nepal from different parts of the world to help in our volunteering projects – you are our hope and strength.

Nepali Host Family utilizes the fund-raised money for different social work projects in Nepal. With the money fund-raised by Alice and her friends, we have donated a Student Microscope to a local school in Kathmandu. This school does not even have a science laboratory. The teachers conduct the experiments in the classrooms. The donation of the Microscope was so much helpful for the teachers in teaching biology. The students are excited to see different histological slides of Amoeba, Hydra, animal cells and plant cells with it.
We aim to build a science laboratory for this school one day!

Some of the participant volunteers also help in our projects by collecting donations. They tell about the volunteering project they are going to get involved in to their friends, family and relatives. With the help of your family, friends and relatives you can spread the word in your school, university or town. People will be willing to donate if they can be made convinced that their money is going for a worthwhile cause.

Last year one of our volunteer from the Netherlands, Mr. Holger Neumann was able to collect enough donations to buy new clothes for the 35 children of an orphanage. Mr. Neumann had collected the donations from friends and family before coming to Nepal to volunteer in the orphanage. He took all the 35 children to a local supermarket for buying them new clothes. It was the first time for these children to visit a supermarket as they never get to go for shopping.

Our sincere thanks to all the wonderful people who have donated and fund-raised for our projects and thank you once again for believing in us!

We believe what Mother Teresa had once said, “If you can’t feed a hundred people, then feed just one.”

Nepali Host Family team

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volunteer program review

Volunteering, though highly commendable and personally rewarding, can be incredibly expensive! I still vividly remember the intense shock I experienced when researching potential organizations for the first time. Some of them charged ridiculous amounts, with prices equaling (and many times exceeding!) my ENTIRE travel budget! Sure these companies came highly recommended and had excellent track records, nevertheless it would be simply impossible for the average student traveler like me to afford it!

Then by a miracle I found the “Nepali Host Family”. I recall my first read-through of their Facebook page leaving me in disbelief: “these guys are offering all the same experiences as the other firms but at a MUCH CHEAPER cost! This must be fake”

So I looked into it and in no time I found out that they were serious! Their difference, they insisted, was to focus on the betterment of Nepal, not on profit. It Sounds too good to be true right?

Nevertheless my girlfriend and I decided to throw caution aside and give this organization a shot, and boy are we glad we did! Here’s why:

  1. The volunteer accommodation was awesome! We were set up in a spacious 2 bedroom complex with a communal western washroom (shared with only two other volunteers). Included was a communal kitchen which brings me to my next point…
  2. The food was incredible! Breakfasts and dinners are made by a house keeping woman who was super nice and who understood the meaning of “big portions” haha!
  3. The volunteer Program was nice of course! As I am going to study medical studies, the organization arranged time for me to shadow doctors at the local hospital. I can’t explain how amazing this was, being able to see patients being treated for ailments I had never seen or even heard of before! It was all definitely an eye-opening experience!Being at the hospital as a Medical volunteer in Nepal was awesome! The doctors immediately took me under their wing, walking me through their methods and procedures. The patient flow was a little slow (which was off-putting in the beginning) but this soon proved to be a blessing since it allowed more explanation time and even enabled  me to interact with the patients!But the highlight of it all was when I was invited into the O.R. by the chief of surgery to witness an operation! It was a pancreatic stone removal surgery which the chief was handling himself! The procedure lasted a little over two hours (since the patient had amassed over 10x the usual stone deposits) but the real showcase was the new technology which the surgeon used which was unique to only a handful of medical centers on the planet (I was informed that it was designed and produced in Beijing – which is also where the chief spent the time to study the skills required for this technique).  All in all, my time at the hospital was definitely well spent thanks to the wonderful cast of doctors there as well as all the eye-opening cases I was able to be a part of (a majority of which I’d never see in my homeland of Canada).
  4. and finally the orphanage with the children eager to learn and full of enthusiasm for us western new comers! I honestly spent every afternoon there and I don’t regret a minute of it! These kids were awesome (to be honest they weren’t all young kids; some were in their teens so it was a great mix of ages). Jamming out on their guitar, singing songs, helping with homework and of course playing football are still some of the best memories I’ve had during ALL my travels! The orphanage is by the far the single more important reason why I will one day return to Nepal!

So in all I had a wonderful time volunteering in Nepal, all thanks to the “Nepali Host Family” organization. I highly recommend it to everyone.

Jonathan
Canada

Festival of lights (Deepawali) in Nepal

Nepal is a land full of cultural diversity as people following different religions such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Christianity, Islam and other religions live together in harmony. The month of October – November sees a lot of tourists in Nepal because it is the main trekking season and today we are going to tell you one another good reason to travel Nepal in October – November.

The two great big festivals of the Hindus of Nepal, Dashain and Tihar (Deepawali) fall during the month of October – November. The first big festival Dashain is celebrated for 15 days and the second big festival Tihar (Deepawali) is celebrated for 5 days. Dashain falls between late September to mid October and Deepawali falls between late October to early November.

During last October, some of our volunteers got to witness the great Nepali festival of Tihar (Deepawali) and celebrate it in Nepali way. There were three Australian volunteers in Nepal working in an orphanage with 40 kids. The children of the orphanage celebrate the festival every year by visiting different houses and showing their dancing and singing talents in order to raise funds.

The 3rd, 4th and 5th days of Deepawali are the main days where children and youngsters go to different houses of their neighbors, friends or relatives to play Dheusi and Bhailo. Dheusi and Bhailo is the typical act where they sing the typical Dheusi and Bhailo songs and other Nepali songs. They dance with music and some people even play Nepali musical instruments like Madal and even western instruments like Guitar. They go to houses after houses and entertain the people living in the house. This is done because of the cultural reason and for fun. The people living in the house can also sing and dance and they exchange good wishes among each other. They can play Dheusi and Bhailo for a short time or it can go for hours as well. By the end of the Dheusi and Bhailo, It is a tradition that the people living in the house have to give some money to the people who came to the house to play Dheusi and Bhailo. The people who came to play Dheusi and Bhailo leave the house by giving blessings. This is also the festival when people get to play with firecrackers, play cards, meet distant relatives, and eat varieties of food, sing and dance. The festival brings everyone together and celebrates good time with family and friends. The joy of the festival drives everyone happy from children to elders.

Another big significance of the festival is that Hindu people worship goddess Laxmi (the goddess of wealth) by making every corner of the house bright. They light candles, oil lamp, and colorful lights and decorate the houses. Even the streets get decorated. This is why Tihar (Deepawali) is also called the festival of lights. In the 3rd day of Tihar, people worship cow which is holy and seen as the form of goddess Laxmi. In the 4th day, people worship bull. The 5th and the final day is Bhai tika or brothers and sisters day where the sisters put 7 colors tika on the forehead of the brothers, worship them with garland made of special flowers, give them sweets, fruits and different varieties of food to eat. In return the brothers have to give some money or present to the sisters.

During the festival of lights our volunteers who were in Nepal especially got to be a part of the festival and experience it from close. One of the volunteers, Lauren spent most of her time with the kids of the orphanage by giving them a helping hand in preparing many things needed for the festival celebrations. She made garlands, went with the children to different houses to play Dheusi Bhailo and made many Nepali brothers at the orphanage. We saw Lauren even got a Henna tattoo on her hand which the orphanage kids made for her. Nepalese ladies get Henna tattoo especially during festivals and different joyful occasions. So Tihar or Deepawali is the festival which you should not miss if you are planning to travel Nepal.

 

 

volunteers making MoMo for the kids

It was a day filled with excitement as we were making momo’s for the kids of the orphanage. Momo is a popular dish, which every Nepalese love and anyone who visits Nepal must taste it. We were making momo’s for about 35 kids of the orphanage and the staff’s. Actually the plan was of one of the Danish volunteer who was working at the orphanage and another volunteer, Lauren decided to go ahead. It was not a simple task as making momo’s takes long time and lot of work like chopping vegetables, making sauce, making dough, giving shape to momo’s and other things was needed to be done.The volunteers were making momo for the first time and it was also the first time that the children at the orphanage were making momo at their home.

The volunteers bought the necessary ingredients from nearby shop and we started up with the preparations at 3 PM which was already late. Cutting, chopping, preparing this and that takes long time and we were making momo’s for about 45 people in total. It was so nice that some of the older kids came up to help, some chopping onions, chopping cabbages, some making dough. When the onion was killing one’s eye, the next kid was ready to help finish chopping onions. It was fun working as a team making momo’s but we were not sure if we would be able to finish making it on time and feed the kids as the dinner time was around 6.30 pm. After 5 hours of work finally it was at 8 pm when we gave the first set of momo’s  to the smaller kids. Then we gave momo’s to the older kids.

We were not sure how many momo’s to make and could not estimate but we did make a lot of momo’s and all the kids were full and happy at last. Yummy! the momo’s were really good and it gave us immense satisfaction that we did it and the momo’s were the best made! The volunteers left for their host family at around 9.30 pm. What a good moment it was, mostly we were happy to see the kids eating lots of momo’s and asking for more and more.

volunteering with children in Nepal

Well it’s a bit hard to write about my experience as a volunteer here because I just got back from Annapurna Base Camp trekking. I went to Annapurna Base Camp trek and Poon Hill trek, did it in 10 days with my friend and saw the REAL Nepal. I am about to leave Nepal tomorrow. But I am thankful to Nepali Host Family; you really made me feel like home. I volunteered in two placements during my stay in Nepal. In the school, I was during the exams, so I helped the kids with some info and ask them a lot of questions to think about. In the Orphanage, I went after school to help the kids to prepare for their exams.

I am impressed how bright and kind are the Nepali children. I learned to be honest and to observe because this way I can help even when they don’t know how to ask for help. I taught some things which I teach back at home in Bulgaria, some Leadership training skills. The volunteering work at the orphanage gave meaning to my Nepal stay.

I will miss you all
Marieta
Gabrovo, Bulgaria.